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Brick House

Oxford
2001 - 2003
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In this design an existing poorly extended house with a fragmented layout was reconfigured into a house of flowing spaces and well proportioned rooms for comfortable living and generous entertaining. The original orthogonal form was extended in length and partially rebuilt using a variable coloured engineering brick: the more precise smooth material defining the tectonic potential of the new volumes. The new material describes the nature of the transformation as something crafted to suit its owners. A single storey brick box was added to the back to make a kitchen. These moves have consolidated the main form and quality of the existing house. Standard elements were revised by slight adjustments: the windows inset, and a steel and glass canopy introduced at the entrance over the repositioned oak front door with its more substantial doorcases.
The ground floor rooms were re-ordered into a flowing series of formal reception rooms around the stair hall as social spaces, connected by smaller informal spaces for the clients' personal use.
The spaces were reorientated towards their fine garden. The part near the house was re-landscaped as an important component of the project, which reconsidered how the family lived inside, and outside the house. Tall triple folding timber doors open the house to the garden in the summer. Internally, the new rooms were shaped by large joinery insertions changing walls into solid and veneered pearwood cabinets, lining the house to described a refined inhabitation.





 





Year 2001–2003
Location: Oxford
Client Private: Private client
Project Status: Built
Photographs: David Grandorge

See press article page Architecture Today July 2003